(1) Capital Identity Projection and Academic Performance Among Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Students

Steven C. Williams, II
Florida A&M University

Novell E. Tani
Florida A&M University

Abstract

This study examines the capital identity projection (CIP) phenomena and the extent to which the presentation of “economic success” in historically Black college and university (HBCU) students contributes to their academic performance (students’ self-reported grade point average [GPA]). The present study adds to the literature by analyzing respondents’ financial literacy before graduation and examining the psychosocial desire for economic success, allowing for an understanding of said desires’ potential effect on collegiate success (e.g., academic performance/GPA). Findings indicate that positive CIP values (e.g., work-college balance and CIP for financial wellness) positively correlate with academic performance. Also, adverse CIP values (e.g., materialism, CIP for status projection, and CIP for ego inflation) negatively correlate with academic performance. Finally, the desire to display status indicative of acquired material goods, in an attempt to present an embellished or false image of economic success, coupled with financial literacy and wellness factors, proved predictive of students’ academic performance. Educational stakeholders are rightly working to afford all students equitable educational experiences, so we provide possible implications of CIP and offer possible solutions to address the social and educational inequities that operate outside the traditional realms of discussions around such topics.

Citation

Williams II, S.C., & Tani, N.E. (2021) Capital Identity Projection and Academic Performance Among Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Students. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 59(1), 72-89.

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