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(6) The Vulnerability Gap: Group Differences in Childhood Trauma and Resilience on a Florida College Campus

Ann Perko
Florida State University

Karen Oehme
Florida State University

Elizabeth C. Ray
Florida State University

Laura Arpan
Florida State University

James J. Clark
Florida State University

Abstract

Colleges are increasingly seeking ways to promote the behavioral health and wellbeing of their students. The current study conducted at a large public university in Florida identified a significant relationship between students’ (N = 1,043) adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and their self-reported resilience. Across the entire sample, as the number of reported ACEs increased, resilience scores, an indicator of wellbeing, decreased. Group comparisons revealed that women, non-whites, and non-heterosexual students reported significantly more ACEs and less resilience than their male, white, and heterosexual peers, respectively. A linear regression analysis revealed that the relationship between ACEs and resilience is moderated by gender, such that for women—who make up a majority of college students in the U.S.—an increase in the number of ACEs predicted a decrease in reported resilience. Others have emphasized the need for the K–12 system to be “trauma-informed.” This study reveals the need for Florida’s institutions of higher learning to be aware of the prevalence and impact of ACEs to better serve students. Campus strategies and targeted intervention efforts are discussed.

Citation

Perko, A., Oehme, K., Ray, E.C., Arpan, L., & Clark, J.J. (2020).  The Vulnerability Gap: Group Differences in Childhood Trauma and Resilience
on a Florida College Campus. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(6), 1-19.

Download: Perko.586.pdf (10 downloads)

(5) Student Perception in a Dual Enrollment Magnet High School on a College Campus

Keisha McIntyre-McCullough
Florida International University

Abstract

Socioemotional research on advanced academic students is limited. Therefore, exploring student perceptions about their experience in one dual enrollment magnet school became a goal for this 2018 microethnographic study. As such, the following overarching research question guided the interviews and surveys of 34 students: How do students perceive their dual enrollment experience on a college campus? The findings were that students were conflicted in their perception about their program while they were adamant about how parents, teachers, and professors should engage with them. The implications deal with college and high school dual enrollment policies, recruitment, socioemotional learning for advanced academic students, parents, and educational professionals.

Citation

McIntyre-McCullough, K. (2020).  Student Perception in a Dual Enrollment Magnet High School on a College Campus. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(5), 1-13.

Download: McIntyreMcCullough585.pdf (19 downloads)

(4) Teaching with Multiple Strategies: An Investigation of Elementary Teachers’ Understandings during a Lesson Study Cycle

Guillermo J. Farfan
Florida State University

Aki Murata
University of Florida

Alysia Roehrig
Florida State University

Abstract

Viewing teachers as learners of policy reform, this exploratory study examines a group of elementary mathematics teachers as they discussed teaching with multiple strategies as found in the new Mathematics Florida Standards during a lesson study cycle. In particular, it describes how teachers: (a) advance different explanations for teaching with multiple strategies in the new standards, and (b) anticipate or recognize major obstacles to the implementation of these new standards. Considerations of this study’s results to further research on teacher professional development and educational reform are also briefly discussed.

Citation

Farfan, G., Murata, A., & Roehrig, A. (2020).  Teaching with Multiple Strategies: An Investigation of Elementary Teachers’ Understandings during a Lesson Study Cycle. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(4), 1-18.

Download: Farfan.584.pdf (9 downloads)

(3) Estimating the Effect of Florida’s Low-100 Reading Program: Summarizing Regression Discontinuity Models with Bayesian Model Averaging

Seyfullah Tingir
Cambium Assessment

Russell Almond
Florida State University

Seyma Intepe-Tingir
University of St. Thomas

Abstract

In 2013, the state of Florida mandated an additional hour of intensive reading instruction for the lowest-performing 100 elementary schools across Florida. This requirement was implemented during the 2013–2014 academic year based on the schools’ ranking in 2012–2013. This study assesses the effectiveness of the extra-hour intervention by using a regression discontinuity design (RDD). Often RDD analyses fit multiple models and then select a single best model using stepwise regression leading to overestimation of the effect size and underestimation of the standard error. This study used the Bayesian model averaging approach, which incorporates uncertainty about the best model. The estimated treatment effect, averaged over the six models and weighted by the models’ posterior probabilities, is 6.1 points (d = .25) with a 95% confidence interval of 5.8 to 6.4 points.

Citation

Tingir, S., Almond, R., & Intepe-Tingir, S. (2020).  Estimating the Effect of Florida’s Low-100 Reading Program: Summarizing Regression Discontinuity Models with Bayesian Model Averaging. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(3), 1-14.

Download: Tingir.583.pdf (13 downloads)

(2) Moving Beyond Damned if You Do, Damned if You Don’t: Readiness for Change

Kristina N. LaVenia Bowling
Green State University

Laura B. Lang
Florida State University

Abstract

We know little about the supports principals need to lead change. This lack of knowledge is unfortunate, because principal leadership is understood to be critical for successful school reform. Using a randomized control trial, we tested whether the opportunity to participate in a year-long, content-focused professional development intervention would help principals feel prepared to provide instructional leadership for the transition to new standards. Results suggest professional development was impactful for principals’ self-reported attitudes toward facilitating the implementation of new standards. Study findings offer support for use of professional development as a means of building principals’ ability to lead change efforts.

Citation

LaVenia, K.N., Lang, L.B. (2020). Moving beyond damned if you do, damned if you don’t: Readiness for change. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(2), 1-21.

Download: LaVenia.582.pdf (54 downloads)