Journal Current

(8) Reading Outside of the Box: HBCU Preservice Teachers, Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Letterbox Lessons

Cheron H. Davis
Florida Atlantic University

Novell E. Tani
Florida Atlantic University

Krystal Bush
Florida Atlantic University

Amelia Fields
Florida Atlantic University

Abstract

This study offers a preliminary investigation of gains in students’ early literacy reading scores when historically Black college or university preservice teachers facilitate letterbox lesson interventions during field clinical experiences with at-risk readers using culturally relevant pedagogy and materials. The aims of this study were to (a) assess overall gains in reading and (b) examine more specific gains in phoneme awareness, letter naming fluency, decoding, and spelling. Using t-test comparisons, results indicate significant gains between the administered pre- and post-reading assessments on phonemic awareness development, letter naming fluency, and spelling abilities. The findings suggest culturally relevant pedagogy combined with clinical letterbox interventions may particularly support the reading achievement of at-risk readers. Additional research is needed to better understand the impact of historically Black college or university preservice teachers’ use of culturally relevant materials and pedagogy and field clinical letterbox interventions with at-risk readers.

Davis, C.H., Tani, N.E., Bush, K., & Fields, A. (2020).  Reading Outside of the Box: HBCU Preservice Teachers, Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Letterbox Lessons. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(8), 1-11.

Download: Davis.588.pdf (1 download)

(7) The Impacts of Individual Reading Conferences on Student Growth and Reading Confidence

Courtney Russo
Florida Atlantic University

Abstract

Anyone who has a first grader, or any first-grade teacher for that matter, understands how critical the subject of reading is within this grade level. The purpose of this study was to examine just how individual student conferencing during independent reading time has an effect on first grade readers’ academic successes and learning confidence. Individual student conferencing is when a teacher meets with individual students to discuss their current reading ability and to assist the student in coming up with ways to improve their reading skills. Conferencing also gives the teacher the ability to assess the student to view their strengths and weaknesses while working with them at their level. A collection of both qualitative and quantitative data was accumulated in this study to determine student growth as well as changes in confidence. Findings showed that student growth increased; however, confidence either decreased or remained the same. I found that even though confidence either showed no change or decreased, the student’s motivation to
read was there.

Citation

Russo, C. (2020). The Impacts of Individual Reading Conferences on Student Growth and Reading Confidence. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(7), 93-101.

Download: 9Russo.587.pdf (10 downloads)

(7) Impacts of Incentives on Struggling Readers

Gina M. Hufty
Florida Atlantic University

Abstract

Reading is a complex process that requires many skills in order to make meaning of text. Therefore, when children struggle to read, it is not a simple fix. This study examined what impact an incentive program had on third- through fifth-grade struggling readers’ motivation to participate in reading interventions and their perceptions of themselves as readers with the hope of increasing achievement and students’ motivation to read. The findings of this study showedbthat the incentive program increased students’ motivation to participate in the reading interventions but did not show significant improvement in students’ self-perception as readers. A third unexpected finding came about as a result of analyzing the pre-survey data. Struggling readers’ negative attitudes toward participating in a reading intervention were not communicated through responses on the pre-survey or were not as negative as initially believed to be by the teacher.

Citation

Hufty, G.M. (2020). Impacts of Incentives on Struggling Readers. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(7), 84-92.

Download: 8Hufty.587.pdf (20 downloads)

(7) Math Confidence in an Elementary Mathematics Classroom

Tara Palmer
P.K. Yonge Developmental Research School

Abstract

I am a fourth- and fifth-grade teacher at a K–12 developmental research school in which I conducted action research examining how instruction impacted student confidence during a mathematics block. I conducted anonymous surveys and student interviews and studied how instructional strategies used for math support positively affect student math confidence and selfperception. The students offered insights into their experiences and suggestions for future implementation. This work developed a unique homework set-up to personalize and support students at their level while targeting specific skills. I will continue to work to increase student self-efficacy.

Citation

Palmer, T. (2020). Math Confidence in an Elementary Mathematics
Classroom. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(7), 75-83.

Download: 7Palmer.587.pdf (16 downloads)

(7) The Influence of Student-Led Conferences on Communication and Dialogue with Parents

Carla-Ann Brown
P.K. Yonge Developmental Research School

Abstract

A sixth-grade World Cultures teacher created a system of dialogue where students reflected on their growth throughout a unit/semester and passed ownership from parents/teachers taking responsibility for assessment of student growth to students taking ownership of their reflection in the Project-Based Learning (PBL) process. The teacher wanted to understand the relationship between participation in student-led conferences/conversations and student agency in the reflection of individual progress. Data included student/family pre-conference notes, conference videos, and student/parent surveys. She found that having the student-led conference transferred ownership of personal habits of work to the students, and the structure of a student-led conference was an effective way for families to connect with their students.

Citation

Brown, C.A. (2020). The Influence of Student-Led Conferences on Communication and Dialogue with Parents. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(7), 58-74.

Download: 6Brown.587.pdf (9 downloads)

(7) Run, Hide, and Fight to Save Your Life

Joann Farmer
Florida Gulf Coast University

Jingshun Zhang
Florida Gulf Coast University

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate students’ gain in self-protection efficacy after participating in face-to-face active shooter training. Research was conducted at a state level university to determine if face-to-face active shooter training for undergraduates was more effective than online training. Face-to-face training was administered to 170 undergraduates in five different classrooms over a 10-day period. Pre- and post-surveys were administered to the participants to determine differences in their understanding of active shooter protocol and confidence in their abilities to execute protocol if needed. Paired sample t tests revealed there were significant differences in the pre- and post-training surveys. ANOVA tests were conducted to determine how much online active shooter training enriched students’ feelings of safety on campus and the degree to which face-to-face active shooter training influenced students’ knowledge of protocol and feelings of being able to protect themselves in an active shooter situation.

Citation

Farmer, J., & Zhang, J. (2020). Run, Hide, and Fight to Save Your Life. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(7), 44-57.

Download: 5Farmer.587.pdf (10 downloads)

(7) An Inquiry to Discover Hispanic Serving Institution Experiences on Serving Hispanic Students

María D. Vásquez-Colina
Florida Atlantic University

Leisha Cali
Hodges University

Bret Danilowicz
Florida Atlantic University

Sunem Beaton-Garcia
Broward College

S. Kent Butler
University of Central Florida

Joaquin Martinez
Miami Dade College

Jeremy Moreland
St. Thomas University

Meline Kevorkian
Nova Southeastern University

Abstract

In this article, a panel of administrators and faculty describe and analyze their institutional experiences across seven Hispanic-serving institutions (HSI). While there is growing research on HSIs in the United States, there is limited published evidence of HSIs discussing their identity. As the Hispanic population increases, scholarly initiatives and student services have an opportunity to focus on Hispanic college enrollment and retention, as well as on fostering cultures representative of Hispanic students’ cultures. The question that guided this panel discussion was: How has HSI status shaped your institution’s organizational identity and initiatives? The inquiry revealed five interrelated elements that compose an HSI identity: institutional aims, student body, campus culture, community connections, and faculty and staff initiatives. A discussion on HSI literacy is offered as a notion to include in the HSI research literature.

Citation

Vásquez-Colina, M.D., Cali, L., Danilowicz, B., Beaton-Garcia, S., Butler, S.K., Martinez, J., Moreland, J., & Kevorkian, M. (2020).  An Inquiry to Discover Hispanic ServingInstitution Experiences on Serving Hispanic Students. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(7), 34-43.

Download: 4Vasquez.587.pdf (13 downloads)

(7) Engaging with 21st Century Methodologies in Contemporary Education Research: Developing a Multi-sited, Distance, Online Ethnography

Daniel Lee
University of Tasmania

William Baker
University of Tasmania

Nick Haywood
University of Tasmania

Abstract

Twenty-first century telecommunications have spawned new developments in anthropological research. Researchers now utilize online tools and investigate virtual social phenomena. A research project at the University of Tasmania required the development of a tailored methodology to investigate real-world activities across multiple education institutions and associated online communities. The study employed a blend of traditional and contemporary approaches assembled from established methodologies. Considerations influencing the development of the methodology are presented with the intention of informing future researchers of valid methodological design. Ontological and epistemological concerns are addressed to establish a framework for 21st century ethnographical methodologies.

Citation

Lee, D., Baker, W., & Haywood, N. (2020).  Engaging with 21st Century Methodologies in Contemporary Education Research: Developing a Multi-sited, Distance, Online Ethnography. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(7), 20-33.

Download: 3Lee.587.pdf (11 downloads)

(7) Do School and School District Influence Students’ Performance on Civics End-of-Course Assessment? A Multilevel Analysis

Nirmal Ghimire
University of Central Florida

Sushila Regmi
Oslo Metropolitan University

Abstract

This study examined the influence of school and school district variables on schools’ average results for the civics end-of-course (EOC) assessment. A two-level hierarchical analysis was conducted using the percentage of students from low-SES per school, school size, and school type as Level 1 predictors and the average district poverty ratio and non-Hispanic White population as Level 2 moderators. The results showed that a higher percentage of poor students, district poverty level, and the district non-Hispanic White population had a negative impact on the average number of students who score proficient on civics EOC assessments. Similarly, school size and school type were significant predictors of the average school civics EOC proficiency rate.

Citation

Ghimire, N., & Regmi, S. (2020).  Do School and School District Influence Students’ Performance on Civics End-of-Course Assessment? A Multilevel Analysis. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(7), 3-19.

Download: 2Ghimire.587.pdf (20 downloads)

(7) Florida Educational Research Association 2019 Annual Meeting Special Issue

Jennifer R. Wolgemuth
University of South Florida

Alyson Adams
University of Florida

Maria D. Vasquez
Florida Atlantic University

Lodi Rohrer
University of South Florida

Deb Christie
University of South Florida

Abstract

The FJER Editorial Team is excited to announce publication of the first annual FERA Special Issue! The FERA 2019 Special Issue is a collection of manuscripts and brief reports featuring important work presented at the 64th Florida Educational Research Association’s Annual Meeting (FERA 2019). The special issue includes 9 thoughtful contributions from university faculty and graduate students, school district administrators and teachers who submitted their work in response to our call for papers. Collectively, these contribution foster thinking and dialogue in the Florida educational research community that informs education policy, practice, pedagogy, and inquiry in schools, districts, universities, and other educational contexts. We thank our authors for their roles in stimulating these important conversations!

Citation

Wolgemuth, J.R., Adams, A., Vasquez, M.D., Roher, L., & Christie, D. (2020). Florida Educational Research Association 2019 Annual Meeting Special Issue. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(7), 1-2.

Download: 1Wolgemuth.587.pdf (13 downloads)

(6) The Vulnerability Gap: Group Differences in Childhood Trauma and Resilience on a Florida College Campus

Ann Perko
Florida State University

Karen Oehme
Florida State University

Elizabeth C. Ray
Florida State University

Laura Arpan
Florida State University

James J. Clark
Florida State University

Abstract

Colleges are increasingly seeking ways to promote the behavioral health and wellbeing of their students. The current study conducted at a large public university in Florida identified a significant relationship between students’ (N = 1,043) adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and their self-reported resilience. Across the entire sample, as the number of reported ACEs increased, resilience scores, an indicator of wellbeing, decreased. Group comparisons revealed that women, non-whites, and non-heterosexual students reported significantly more ACEs and less resilience than their male, white, and heterosexual peers, respectively. A linear regression analysis revealed that the relationship between ACEs and resilience is moderated by gender, such that for women—who make up a majority of college students in the U.S.—an increase in the number of ACEs predicted a decrease in reported resilience. Others have emphasized the need for the K–12 system to be “trauma-informed.” This study reveals the need for Florida’s institutions of higher learning to be aware of the prevalence and impact of ACEs to better serve students. Campus strategies and targeted intervention efforts are discussed.

Citation

Perko, A., Oehme, K., Ray, E.C., Arpan, L., & Clark, J.J. (2020).  The Vulnerability Gap: Group Differences in Childhood Trauma and Resilience
on a Florida College Campus. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(6), 1-19.

Download: Perko.586.pdf (28 downloads)

(5) Student Perception in a Dual Enrollment Magnet High School on a College Campus

Keisha McIntyre-McCullough
Florida International University

Abstract

Socioemotional research on advanced academic students is limited. Therefore, exploring student perceptions about their experience in one dual enrollment magnet school became a goal for this 2018 microethnographic study. As such, the following overarching research question guided the interviews and surveys of 34 students: How do students perceive their dual enrollment experience on a college campus? The findings were that students were conflicted in their perception about their program while they were adamant about how parents, teachers, and professors should engage with them. The implications deal with college and high school dual enrollment policies, recruitment, socioemotional learning for advanced academic students, parents, and educational professionals.

Citation

McIntyre-McCullough, K. (2020).  Student Perception in a Dual Enrollment Magnet High School on a College Campus. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(5), 1-13.

Download: McIntyreMcCullough585.pdf (42 downloads)

(4) Teaching with Multiple Strategies: An Investigation of Elementary Teachers’ Understandings during a Lesson Study Cycle

Guillermo J. Farfan
Florida State University

Aki Murata
University of Florida

Alysia Roehrig
Florida State University

Abstract

Viewing teachers as learners of policy reform, this exploratory study examines a group of elementary mathematics teachers as they discussed teaching with multiple strategies as found in the new Mathematics Florida Standards during a lesson study cycle. In particular, it describes how teachers: (a) advance different explanations for teaching with multiple strategies in the new standards, and (b) anticipate or recognize major obstacles to the implementation of these new standards. Considerations of this study’s results to further research on teacher professional development and educational reform are also briefly discussed.

Citation

Farfan, G., Murata, A., & Roehrig, A. (2020).  Teaching with Multiple Strategies: An Investigation of Elementary Teachers’ Understandings during a Lesson Study Cycle. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(4), 1-18.

Download: Farfan.584.pdf (17 downloads)

(3) Estimating the Effect of Florida’s Low-100 Reading Program: Summarizing Regression Discontinuity Models with Bayesian Model Averaging

Seyfullah Tingir
Cambium Assessment

Russell Almond
Florida State University

Seyma Intepe-Tingir
University of St. Thomas

Abstract

In 2013, the state of Florida mandated an additional hour of intensive reading instruction for the lowest-performing 100 elementary schools across Florida. This requirement was implemented during the 2013–2014 academic year based on the schools’ ranking in 2012–2013. This study assesses the effectiveness of the extra-hour intervention by using a regression discontinuity design (RDD). Often RDD analyses fit multiple models and then select a single best model using stepwise regression leading to overestimation of the effect size and underestimation of the standard error. This study used the Bayesian model averaging approach, which incorporates uncertainty about the best model. The estimated treatment effect, averaged over the six models and weighted by the models’ posterior probabilities, is 6.1 points (d = .25) with a 95% confidence interval of 5.8 to 6.4 points.

Citation

Tingir, S., Almond, R., & Intepe-Tingir, S. (2020).  Estimating the Effect of Florida’s Low-100 Reading Program: Summarizing Regression Discontinuity Models with Bayesian Model Averaging. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(3), 1-14.

Download: Tingir.583.pdf (22 downloads)

(2) Moving Beyond Damned if You Do, Damned if You Don’t: Readiness for Change

Kristina N. LaVenia Bowling
Green State University

Laura B. Lang
Florida State University

Abstract

We know little about the supports principals need to lead change. This lack of knowledge is unfortunate, because principal leadership is understood to be critical for successful school reform. Using a randomized control trial, we tested whether the opportunity to participate in a year-long, content-focused professional development intervention would help principals feel prepared to provide instructional leadership for the transition to new standards. Results suggest professional development was impactful for principals’ self-reported attitudes toward facilitating the implementation of new standards. Study findings offer support for use of professional development as a means of building principals’ ability to lead change efforts.

Citation

LaVenia, K.N., Lang, L.B. (2020). Moving beyond damned if you do, damned if you don’t: Readiness for change. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(2), 1-21.

Download: LaVenia.582.pdf (67 downloads)

(1) Facilitating Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Professional Development for Novice Teachers in a High-Needs School With a Majority Black Population

Kimberly Miccichi
Pinellas County Schools

Abstract

In today’s era of resegregation, high-needs schools that are serving mostly students of color and from poverty often hire novice teachers. These teachers are predominantly White, middle-class females who may find it difficult to relate to their students from different races, cultures, and socioeconomic backgrounds. I examined how I could provide four professional development (PD) sessions centered on culturally responsive classroom management (CRCM) for five novice teachers working in a school with a majority Black population qualifying for free and reduced-price lunches. I studied the experiences my teachers had as participants and my facilitation of these sessions to better understand how to help novice teachers develop culturally responsive practices. Three themes emerged that related to CRCM for novice teachers: novice teacher backgrounds, novice teacher classroom challenges, and facilitation–lessons learned. This study has implications for school leaders as well as individuals who (a) design and facilitate PD, (b) lead teacher preparation and induction programs, and (c) study their own practice through action research.

Citation

Miccichi, K. (2020). Facilitating culturally responsive classroom management professional development for novice teachers in a high-needs school with a majority Black population. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 58(1), 1-11.

Download: Miccichi_581.pdf (248 downloads)