Journal Current

(1) Why Music Matters: How Participation in a Professional Learning Community Can Expand the Role of Music Educators

This article has been retracted at request of the author. The article includes duplicated content, analysis, and findings published in a previous article1.”
1) Harris, M. (2017) “Why Music Matters: How Participation in a Professional Learning Community can Expand the Role of Music Educators,” Journal of Practitioner Research, 2(2), Article 5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5038/2379-9951.2.2.1042.

(2) Introducing the Florida Educational Research Association 2018 Annual Meeting Special Issue

Jennifer R. Wolgemuth
University of South Florida

Alyson Adams
University of Florida

Maria D. Vasquez
Florida Atlantic University

Lodi Rohrer
University of South Florida

Deb Christie
University of South Florida

Abstract
The FJER Editorial Team is excited to announce publication of the first annual FERA Special Issue! The FERA 2018 Special Issue is a collection of manuscripts and brief reports featuring important work presented at the 63rd Florida Educational Research Association’s Annual Meeting (FERA 2018). The special issue includes 16 thoughtful contributions from university faculty and graduate students, school district administrators and teachers who submitted their work in response to our call for papers. Collectively, these contribution foster thinking and dialogue in the Florida educational research community that informs education policy, practice, pedagogy, and inquiry in schools, districts, universities, and other educational contexts. We thank our authors for their roles in stimulating these important conversations!

Citation
Wolgemuth, J.R., Adams, A., Vasquez, M.D., Roher, L., & Christie, D. (2019). Introducing the Florida Educational Research Association 2018 Annual Meeting special issue. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 1-3.

Download: 1.-Wolgemuth.572.pdf (30 downloads)

(2) Advancement Via Individual Determination: The Relationship of Program Participation in Middle School with Behavioral Outcomes in Ninth Grade

Abigail Todhunter-Reid
School District of Palm Beach County

Abstract
Using the Coarsened Exact Matching approach, this study examines whether students who take AVID electives in middle school have better ninth-grade behavioral outcomes than comparable students who do not take AVID electives. Findings indicate that students who complete at least one AVID elective from sixth grade to ninth grade have fewer disciplinary referrals, miss fewer days of school, and take more advanced courses in ninth grade than comparable students who do not complete an AVID elective.

Citation
Todhunter-Reid, A. (2019). Advancement via individual determination: The relationship of program participation in middle school with behavioral outcomes in ninth grade. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 4-9.

Download: 2.-Todhunter-Reid.572.pdf (23 downloads)

(2) Analyzing High School Administrators’ Knowledge and Confidence to Provide Instructional Leadership in Digital School Environments

Andrew Shepherd
University of Central Florida

Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine high school administrators’ perceived knowledge and confidence to lead in a digital school (one-to-one classroom) environment. This study utilized the 62-item Digital Instructional Leadership Readiness Instrument (DILRI; Taylor & Shepherd, 2016) to measure high school administrators’ knowledge and confidence to lead in a digital school environment. High school administrators within the target school district completed the DILRI at two separate points in time: September 2016 and June 2017. Based on these two administrations, this study’s three research questions were answered. Based on the data collected, Experience Supervising Others and Colleagues were the two factors the surveyed high school administrators ranked as influencing their knowledge and confidence. Additionally, high school administrators indicated they perceive themselves to be knowledgeable and confident in developing digital school culture factors of Leadership Teams, Empowering Teachers, and Shared Vision. This study provides administrators, directors, school boards, superintendents, and other school district leaders with relevant information relating to the self-reported readiness of high school administrators to lead in a digital school environment.

Citation
Shepherd, A. (2019). Analyzing high school administrators’ knowledge and confidence to provide instructional leadership in digital school environments. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 10-17.

Download: 3.-Shepherd.572.pdf (24 downloads)

(2) An Inquiry into Literacy Engagement Practices at a Rural, High-Poverty School

April F. Fleetwood
University of Florida

Abstract
Much research on literacy of urban students of poverty exists; however, the limited studies of students of rural poverty has created a “hidden achievement gap” (Azano, 2015, p. 267) in the United States. Educators need studies that focus on marginalized students becoming proficient in literacy; furthermore, literacy engagement was a significant problem of practice at my rural, high-poverty school. My practitioner research question-How do I engage high school students in literacy at a rural, high-poverty school?-addressed this problem. My inquiry revealed that the following practices impacted students’ behavioral, emotional, and cognitive engagement (Fredricks & McColskey, 2012) in literacy:

  • accountability, built through routines and provisions, (teacher) investment in assignments, and collaborative groups and discussions;
  • building relationships, through praise, (student) sense of ownership, and open communication and student voice;
  • and seeking relevance to student interest through challenge, future preparation, humor and entertainment, and (student) choice.

Citation
Fleetwood, A. F. (2019). An inquiry into literacy engagement practices at a rural, high-poverty school. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 18-26.

Download: 4.-Fleetwood.572.pdf (25 downloads)

(2) The Intersection of Standards Based Grading and Universal Design for Learning in a Sixth Grade Language Arts Classroom

Blake Mickle Beckett
P.K. Yonge Developmental Research School

Abstract
A sixth-grade English Language Arts teacher at a K–12 developmental research school conducted action research examining the experiences of students in her class related to her application of Standards Based Grading (SBG) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL). She conducted anonymous surveys and analyzed how course grades compared with results on the Florida Standards Assessment (FSA). The students offered insights into their experiences and suggestions for future curriculum design regarding SBG and UDL strategies. For 80% of the 110 students, class grades aligned with FSA scores. The teacher will continue to employ SBG and UDL in the future.

Citation
Beckett, B.M. (2019). The intersection of standards based grading and universal design for learning in a sixth grade language arts classroom. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 27-38.

Download: 5.-Beckett.572.pdf (33 downloads)

(2) Using Citizen Science Projects to Increase Student Interest and Perceptions of Relevance in AP Environmental Science: An Inquiry Study

Renee Andrews
P. K. Yonge Developmental Research School

Abstract
Teacher inquiry was completed to determine how Advanced Placement (AP) Environmental Science student participation in citizen science projects would influence students’ perception of relevance of my course. I collected baseline data through a questionnaire that surveyed student interest, course relevance, and views regarding their contributions to the scientific community. Students selected a project that allowed them to engage in citizen science. They completed journal entries about the process and their attitude toward their citizen science study. I provided guided questions for the journaling process. I also kept a journal that included possible evolution of student attitudes. After the students completed their projects, they took the same questionnaire to see if there had been an attitude shift. Results indicated that most students found the work to be interesting and relevant, and that citizen science projects encouraged a belief that students can and should think of themselves as valuable contributors to the body of scientific knowledge.

Citation
Andrews, R. (2019). Using citizen science projects to increase student interest and perceptions of relevance in AP Environmental Science: An inquiry study. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 39-48.

Download: 6.-Andrews.572.pdf (22 downloads)

(2) Three-Dimensional Science Learning and Assessment in Biology

Mickey MacDonald
P. K. Yonge Developmental Research School

Abstract
The elimination of academic tracking alongside a move to institute standards-based assessment and proficiency-based learning led a biology teacher to adopt the national Next Generation Science Standards along with the three-dimensional learning framework for instruction and assessment which led to two questions of practice: (a) What is three-dimensional learning? and (b) How can three-dimensional learning be implemented within a high school biology course? Pre- and post-test data, and student scientific arguments were examined during the implementation of a pilot three-dimensional learning unit on evolution. Results from analyses of these data led the biology teacher to seek professional learning to deepen her understanding of three-dimensional learning and to develop scaffolds to support students in transitioning to this change in assessment practice.

Citation
MacDonald, M. (2019). Three-dimensional science learning and assessment in biology. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 49-61.

Download: 7.-MacDonald.572.pdf (21 downloads)

(2) The Impact of Choice Novels on Student Reading Motivation

Jessica Baker
Florida Atlantic University High School

Abstract
Too often, reading instruction in schools does not encourage or support a classroom culture that fosters intrinsic reading motivation. Through this teaching inquiry project, I modified my approach to teaching literature and incorporated independent novel choice with book clubs into my high school English classroom. My research study examined if choice novels impacted reading motivation. Over the course of the project, I collected qualitative and quantitative data to determine the impact of choice novels on my students. Findings indicated that choice novels and book clubs enriched students’ conversations about literature and furthered their connections to one another. I found that this choice novel reading program brought back a genuine interest in reading as a result of an increase in reading motivation.

Citation
Baker, J. (2019). The impact of choice novels on student reading motivation. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 62-71.

Download: 8.-Baker.572.pdf (25 downloads)

(2) APA Style Writing Instruction in Graduate Education

Melanie R. F. Law
Florida Southern College

Abstract
Writing skills are important for graduate students to be successful in their academic programs. However, some graduate students are underprepared for the rigor of academic writing. A doctor of education student designed an APA Style writing workshop using a systematic method outlined by Dick, Carey, and Carey (2015). The workshop included online videos, group discussion, online quiz games, a hands-on activity, handouts, and a PowerPoint lecture. The current study assessed the effectiveness of the workshop on teaching select elements of APA Style writing. The results of the repeated measures design indicate that the instruction increased participants’ (N = 19) knowledge of elements of APA Style and reduced the number of errors participants made in written references, including those participants with prior formal APA Style instruction. Additionally, there appears to be a demand among graduate students for more support in the development of their writing skills.

Citation
Law, M. (2019). APA style writing instruction in graduate education. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 72-80.

Download: 9.-Law.572.pdf (123 downloads)

(2) Augmented Reality to the Rescue of Language Learners

Alia Hadid
Patrick Mannion
Babak Khoshnevisan
University of South Florida

Abstract
Technology permeates all aspects of our lives, including the field of education. As educators in the field of language learning, we understand the importance of technology and the benefits it brings to classrooms. This inspired us to explore the use of an ever-evolving form of technology, augmented reality (AR), to help English learners (ELs). The purpose of this conceptual paper is to shed light on the potential value of using AR in language classrooms and provide an example of how teachers might adapt textbooks for ELs. The model we provide is a project, called “Reader Buddy,” in which we augment vocabulary, integrate skills, and extend learning beyond the boundaries of classrooms. A work in progress, Reader Buddy provides an example of how AR-based textbook supplements have potential to improve the quality of language teaching and learning. These AR supplements come to the rescue of ELs who face language-related struggles in their classes.

Citation
Hadid, A., Mannion, P., & Khoshnevisan, B. (2019). Augmented reality to the rescue of language learners. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 81-89.

Download: 10.-Hadid.572.pdf (35 downloads)

(2) Integrating CALL to Develop Metacognitive and English Proficiency Skills in EAP Classrooms

Imelda Bangun
Patrick Mannion
Zhengjie Li
Ke Cheng
University of South Florida

Abstract
The immersion of technology in the 21st century has changed the pedagogical foundation of the English for Academic Purposes (EAP) field. Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) materials, when integrated into content-based EAP classrooms, have great potential to enhance the learning experiences of second language (L2) learners. This paper explores the significance of integrating CALL tools in two EAP classrooms to develop the metacognitive skills of L2 learners. Analysis of pre and post CALL instruction surveys and pre and post writing scores of 26 advanced EAP students indicated that the use of CALL tools had a significant effect on helping them develop their metacognitive skills.

Citation
Bangun, I., Mannion, P., Li, Z., & Cheng, K. (2019). Integrating CALL to develop metacognitive and English proficiency skills in EAP classrooms. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 90-108.

Download: 11.-Bangun.572.pdf (26 downloads)

(2) IPA as a Method for Identifying Education and Training Needs of Informal Caregivers

Martha M. Snyder
Laurie P. Dringus
Nova Southeastern University

Abstract
Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) is a qualitative research method that focuses on understanding, in detail, a person’s lived experience. Principles from phenomenology, hermeneutics, and idiography serve as IPA’s theoretical foundation for understanding meaning within a specific context. In this paper we describe how we used IPA to investigate how informal caregivers perceive and use remote monitoring technologies (RMTs) to help monitor and care for their family members who have dementia and are living at home. We describe the study with a particular focus on how we used IPA to analyze interview transcripts of four informal caregivers and identified education and training needs relative to making informed decisions about RMT adoption and use. Implications for researchers and educators who are interested in conducting and teaching IPA are discussed.

Citation
Snyder, M. M., & Dringus, L.P. (2019). IPA as a method for identifying education and training needs of informal caregivers. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 109-121.

Download: 12.-Snyder.572.pdf (160 downloads)

(2) “Those Who Do Not Learn from History…”: Contemporary Implications from the History of Teacher Inquiry

James Rigney
Amanda Pate
Tara Ferland
University of Florida

Abstract
Over the preceding century, interest in teacher inquiry has ebbed and flowed, yet the teacher inquiry movement presents consistent themes that remain relevant to contemporary teachers, teacher educators, and scholars. This historical overview of teacher inquiry surfaces implications for practitioners today. It is presented in three eras: the recognition of the teacher as inquirer in the 1930s–1950s, the implications of the Civil Rights movement and the quest for excellence in the 1960s–1980s, and the resurgence of teacher inquiry in the “messy” 1990s and 2000s. The very earliest era of teacher inquiry demonstrates the importance of teacher autonomy and administrative support. The second era points to the place of inquiry in promoting social equity and excellence in education. The final era foregrounds the nonlinear nature of the inquiry process and the importance of collaboration among teacher inquirers.

Citation
Rigney, J., Pate, A., & Ferland, T. (2019). “Those who do not learn from history…”: Contemporary implications from the history of teacher inquiry. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 122-132.

Download: 13.-Rigney.572.pdf (24 downloads)

(2) Positioning Teachers as Researchers: Lessons in Empowerment, Change, and Growth

Michelle Vaughan
Christina Cavallaro
Jessica Baker
Cheri Celesti
Christopher Clevenger
Hannah Darling
Rebecca Kasten
Maria Laing
Rachel Marbach
Agnes Timar
Kelli Wilder
Florida Atlantic University

Abstract
This inquiry explores the impact of an action research course, taught at a university laboratory school, on the teachers involved as researchers, professionals, and practitioners. Through action research coursework and project design, teachers in this project worked together to plan, conduct, and analyze their individual action research projects over the course of a 15-week semester. Guided by the question: “What is the impact of an action research course experience on teachers’ perceptions of their role as researchers and practitioners?” this manuscript brings together teachers’ written reflections to shed light on the empowering nature of teacher research.

Citation
Vaughan, M., Cavallaro, C., Baker, J., Celesti, C., Clevenger, C., Darling, H., Kasten, R., Laing, M., Marbach, R., Timar, A., & Wilder, K. (2019). Positioning teachers as researchers: Lessons in empowerment, change, and growth. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 133-139.

Download: 14.-Vaughan.572.pdf (30 downloads)

(2) Language-in-Education Planning: The Florida Consent Decree After 25 Years

Maria R. Coady
Mark P. S. Lopez
Shuzhan Li
University of Florida

Abstract
The Florida Consent Decree (“Decree”), a legal document delineating guidelines for the preparation of teachers of English learners (ELs) in the state of Florida, was signed into law in 1990. Although this policy is among the most far-reaching in the United States, requiring all teachers to have preparation for ELs, 25 years have passed with little known about its impact on meeting the learning needs of EL students. This research brief reviews the empirical research on preservice and inservice teacher education under the Decree between 1991 and 2016. We offer recommendations for preparing teachers of ELs in the 21st century.

Citation
Coady, M. R., Lopez, M. P. S., & Li, S. (2019). Language-in-education planning: The Florida Consent Decree after 25 Years. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 140-149.

Download: 15.-Coady.572.pdf (24 downloads)

(2) An Analysis of Geographic Trends in Exceptional Student Education Services

Lodi Rohrer
Alisha Braun
Phyllis Jones
Jennifer R. Wolgemuth
David S. Lamb
Karen Colucci
Vonzell Agosto
Zorka Karanxha
University of South Florida

Abstract
This study examines geographic patterns of inclusive education placements and specialized programs for students with disabilities in a single region of Florida during the 2017–2018 academic year. Publicly available data on exceptional student education services are used to compare three adjacent school districts on enrollment patterns. Thematic mapping of educational placements at the school level is used to illustrate geographic patterns for one of the districts. Overall, results suggest that the majority of students in the region are served for most of the day in general education classrooms. Geographic maps show that schools with specialized programs tend to be clustered in areas with larger populations. These results have important implications for developing transportation routes that can minimize travel times for students with disabilities who attend specialized programs at schools outside of their assigned zone.

Citation
Rohrer, L., Braun, A., Jones, P., Wolgemuth, J.R., Lamb, D.S., Colucci, K., Agosto, V., & Karanxha, Z. (2019). An analysis of geographic trends in exceptional student education services. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 150-157.

Download: 16.-Rohrer.572.pdf (44 downloads)

(2) The Effect of Florida School District Classifications on Academic Outcomes: A Multivariate Analysis

Lauren Raubaugh
Ying Xiong
University of Central Florida

Abstract
This study takes a macro-scale look at the state of Florida, utilizing aggregated data from all 67 of its school districts from academic years 2015–2016 and 2016–2017, as a first step to understanding statewide patterns. It details statistical analyses that intend to describe (rather than generalize) trends in student performance on standardized tests by district, testing for an effect of location on performance when accounting for additional student variables. Findings can provide a framework around which to inform policy changes and pedagogical techniques in order to improve the quality of education across the state.

Citation
Raubaugh, L., & Xiong, Y. (2019). The effect of Florida school district classifications on academic outcomes: A multivariate analysis. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 158-169.

Download: 17.-Raubaugh.572.pdf (28 downloads)

(2) Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Practice: An Autoethnography

Denise I. Donahue
University of South Florida

Citation
Donahue, D. I. (2019). Bridging the gap between theory and practice: An autoethnography. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(2), 170-173.

Download: 18.-Donahue.572.pdf (38 downloads)

(3) The Effect of a Statewide School Voucher Program on School Enrollment Change Using Difference-in-Differences Methods

Hyun-Ki Shim
Florida State University

Abstract
This study examines the impact of the Florida Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP), a school-based voucher program, on change in total enrollment and share of disadvantaged students by measuring the effect on timing of treatment: immediate effect, lagged effect, and cumulative effect. By collecting school- and district-level time-varying controls from the Census, Common Core of Data, and Florida Department of Education, this study constructed a panel dataset consisting of 1,945 Florida public elementary schools across 67 districts, spanning 2011 through 2016. In general, this study found a negative impact on total school enrollment change, but positive change on free-reduced lunch (FRL) share in enrollment. The negative effect of OSP was only significant within one more year when additional time indicators were included in the analysis. On the other hand, the FRL share shows no significant change from the immediate and lagged effects. All in all, OSP eligibility has a negative impact on total enrollment change which implies that underperforming schools experienced greater student displacement than other schools.

Citation
Shim, H-K. (2019). The Effect of a Statewide School Voucher Program on School Enrollment Change Using Difference-in-Differences Methods. Florida Journal of Educational Research, 57(3), 1-22.

Download: Shim.573.pdf (10 downloads)